Resins..Yay or Nay?

I recently bought some dragon blood resin and was curious on other’s opinions on working with resin?

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I just got some Frankincense resin yesterday and I love it :heartpulse:

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Great topic, @Rowan! My experiences with resin are pretty limited- I’ll be following this closely to learn more :blush:

When I hear ‘resin’ my mind automatically jumps to casting resin for crafting- like the talented @Siofra uses in her beautiful resin pieces! Perhaps she has some tips about ways to use resins? :sparkles:

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I’ll be following too and it’s so dang hard to keep up with everyone’s new titles :sweat_smile:

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I’ve always wondered about them.

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I’ll be following along too. Garnet

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I love using resins but can’t stand trying to light the dang charcoal. I just found a producer of organic resins that I fell in love with. They smell so good.

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Thanks for the info. :slight_smile:

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I hadn’t worked with Resin before, I recently purchased Dragons blood resin and checking it out I took a small piece and lit it, the resin actually drips like blood. I thought that was pretty cool.

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I hadnt used resin either untill i got the Frankincense one and i love it :heartpulse: It smells so different to the oils, almost fruity :heartpulse:

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Resins are metabolic by-products of trees and other plants. There are some famous resins like Gum Arabic which is used as incense for purifying spaces.

Probably the most famous resins are Frankincense and Myrrh, the gift of the Magi to Christ at his birth. They were highly valued at that time, especially for their medicinal healing properties. Hebrews and Christians incorporated them into their ceremonies.

In the Papyrus Ebers of 1500 B.C., priests recommended both resins for the treatment of wounds. Other ailments they were once reported to cure include hemlock poisoning, leprosy, worms, snakebites, diarrhea, plague, scurvy and even baldness! - Source

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In ancient times, the Greeks agreed that Frankincense pleased the Gods so it was present in many offerings to the Gods and Goddeses.

You can burn Frankincense resin to invite the Hellenic deities into your ritual. Any types of resin can be burned to invoke the Element Air. There are many types of resins as there are incenses, and each has its own Magical properties.
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Mountain Rose Herbs are based in the town where I live and they have a great catalog of herbal incenses including resins.

How to burn resins:

  1. Use charcoal disks (Amazon link). Place them inside a burner or fireproof container.
  2. You’ll need tongs for this: light the charcoal by holding it over a lighter or candle.
  3. Once it’s fully ignited (when it turns white), place a pinch of the resin on the charcoal.

You can pour some salt into the bowl of the charcoal disc and then add your resin on it. This will reduce the smoke output.

A small pinch should make the whole room scented for hours. Alternatively, you can

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