Saint John's Wort

I have found your post most interesting, I have learnt alot from all the different witches and their knowledge, so thankyou for your post, I wouldn’t have learnt any of this if you didn’t put it up. No toes stepped on here, just knowledge gained :grin:

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Nope no toes stepped on you should post more @henry :grin: :pagan_book: :hekate_wheel:

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I greatly appreciate your post. :purple_heart::purple_heart::purple_heart: I won’t really worry about it now. I don’t make tinctures just was wondering for my salves. I now know. :purple_heart::purple_heart::purple_heart:

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This is pretty normal for others to build on the starting concept of a post. It’s what we do. I think it’s still all about the herb.

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@henry i want u to understand, and everyone else, if i say something its not to upstage you, or dismiss your information and research. By me stating what i did was just as a hey heads up, just in case. I always give out warnings if i find something might be missing. Bc u will find, as have i, that ALL warnings about an herb medicinially and witchy are necessary in our world. Not everyone is going to do the same amount of work as u. Buuuuutttt if all warnings are given, then it cant be bc of naivete. Its nothing against u or anyone here. Whilst yes your post was about topical, but then it switched with others comments. Thats when i commented. It was a PSA, nothing more. I hope this post doesnt come off as snarky or rude, bc thats not my intent. Its to educate. And having all the info is, in my opinion, the best way to learn and grow. Especially when ingesting an herb, but also when making salves and other topicals as it absorbs into the skin.

@crystal59 my love u can come to me about ANYTHING ANYTIME.

Yall im always here for u. I check spells8 daily. If im tagged or u send me a msg i will see it, and reply.

YOURS ETERNALLY,

YOUR Mistress of Herbs aka Christeena

Thank u all again, @everyone for the honor of yall choosing that title, i hope ive lived up to the hype and prestige.

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@Devenne exactly

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@henry personally i always use dried, and i havent had any complaints. But thats maybe just me.

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I have dry herb I use in spells. That’s all I have :person_shrugging:

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@Devenne i have fresh herbs, but i still use them when dried.

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Do you grow a garden of herbs jw

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I do but, the St. John’s Wort grows wild here in North Idaho. So, I am able to wildcraft it pretty much all Summer.

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I imagine dried St. John’s Wort would still work for spells. For medicine, I used dried for some time, until I read about using fresh for those two herbs. When I moved to North Idaho, it was growing all over the place up here so, I started making infused oil and tincture with the fresh. The results were so much better, that I knew Michael Moore was right. I came up from New Mexico, where I could not find it fresh.

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Thankyou for sharing your experiences with dry and fresh. I appreciate you. I could understand that :revolving_hearts::revolving_hearts::revolving_hearts:

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PS: I haven’t had any success growing the Skullcap in my garden but, I haven’t tried too hard as I have been busy with other projects.

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It’s awesome you have wild st John to choose from.

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Oh wow, how amazing! I honestly don’t know if I could tell St. John’s Wort apart from other plants but I did learn that about ten different species of St. John’s Wort grow here in Maine! I also learned that there are around 300 different plant species, something I had no clue about!

Common St. Johnswort (Hypericum perforatum) is native to Europe and has naturalized in fields and along roadsides throughout North America. Most likely the species perforatum was brought to North America by European settlers for medicinal use. The genus Hypericum contains around 300 species, 10 or which have been found growing in Maine. One of North America’s native Hypericum species, H. pyramidatum, is on Maine’s endangered plant list.

Common St Johnswort - Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners

Now I will be on the lookout for the species that grow here, including the native H. pyramidatum and the common St. Johnswort. Apparently, the common St. John’s Wort is considered a “weed” in wild and cultivated blueberry fields… :joy: I’m not surprised.

Common St. John’s wort, Hypericum perforatum L. (Malpighiales: Hypericaceae), is a weed in Maine wild blueberry fields. A survey of its presence and relative density in 55 wild blueberry fields was conducted from 2013 to 2016. The objectives of this study were to determine how widespread it is as a weed in wild blueberry and whether it might indirectly contribute to beneficial ecosystem services for wild blueberry. It was found that St. John’s wort occurs in about half (45.5%) of all wild blueberry fields surveyed.

Common St. John's Wort (Malpighiales: Hypericaceae): An Invasive Plant in Maine Wild Blueberry Production and Its Potential for Indirectly Supporting Ecosystem Services - PubMed

(Image Source)

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I have some Skullcap that I’m trying to grow from seeds. They are still itty bitty and inside but I’m hoping I’ll have some to transplant in the fall :crossed_fingers:

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