Calling all candle makers! 🕯️

Hi All!

I am in need of some advice, as some of you may be aware, I am in the process of setting up my own business of handmade cosmetics.

I also want to sell candles as I love them, but the last few tests I’ve done the wicks have separated from the metal bit at the bottom and have then set crooked- is this just that I’ve used rubbish wicks? They are just the standard white wicks. Could this be avoided by using wooden wicks maybe? Could anyone recommend a supplier?

Also, I had slight dippage around the wick once the candle set, I’ve read this is quite normal but does anyone with experience know how I can avoid this? I have since “topped them off” and they’re fine but I would like to get them “right” first time if possible.

Lastly when adding dried lavender and rosemary etc, some sank and some rose to the top. Again I’ve read this is normal but I’m wondering how candle makers get it to flow consistently through the candle?

Basically I need all the advice please :joy: and I will pay you with your advise with a free candle once I’m up and running. :pray:

Thank you all lovely people! :heart_eyes:

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Hiya! I’ve very recently got into candle making so I’m here for others’ advice as well!
I can’t really give you advice on the first or last issue although I’ve heard/seen from videos that wooden wicks wouldn’t disconnect from their metal bottoms. I’ve also experience the second issue of sinkholes in the middle. I’ve found that pouring the melted wax after it’s cooled to rough 130-140 degrees F helps a bunch, but then you also run the risk of having to heat it up again just so the wax is melted enough. I’ve seen another way to go about the issue is use a heat gun or a blow dryer to melt the wax after it’s cooled down in the container so that it’ll spread itself evenly.
I hope any of this helps! :smile:

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Thanks @kae! Helps alot thanks! :heart:

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Wood wicks tend to be more expensive. You can glue the wick to the bottom using a hot glue gun or get some wick stickers. For example, CandleScience sells Wick Stickers for this purpose. There are also ones by Cozyours on Amazon which look good too!

I like the site Candlewic for these types of things. Their general advice is not to put anything flammable near the wick and to be extremely careful if you do it:

“Several candle-making projects floating around suggest adding dried rose petals, lavender leaves, cloves and other natural ingredients to your candles. Under no circumstances should any of these be used where the wick comes in direct contact with the materials. Companies that do embed these types of items in their candles have spent significant time developing their process and ensuring that the wick will not come in contact with these materials.”

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Perfect, thank you this helps a lot :blush:

More testing coming up this weekend :grinning:

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When you place the wicks, use a tiny bit of glue to the bottom to hold them centered, make sure it is good and dry before pouring. you can also use a glue gun. Then just before you pour, use a toothpick, or skewer to wind the top of the wick on, so make sure you have them a little longer, and center it in the middle, pour slowly and hang on to the toothpick or skewer if need be to keep centered.

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Fab, thanks @roxanne! :+1:t2:

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