Growing Herbs in the house

So, I have not had very good luck growing herbs in my house this winter. It was especially cold here in Louisville. Does anyone have any recommendations for house herbs?

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The best herb I’ve ever successfully grown indoors, was Basil. Started due to insect infestation outdoors, an indoors by Autumn.
I use filtered water and pour water in saucer, just enough to drink.
Less watering, moving away from windows by night.
A plastic protection, of sorts, helps to keep them warm.
A blanket wrapping the pot.
Basil leaves are very delicate, it will tell you when it needs water(become sticky).
Plants are getting ready to go dormant, so they are under stress.
Extending their season, involves purchasing special lights, to mimic natural light.
you are also resorted to leave pinching, as herb growth slows down.
Not an expert, but is my experience trying to grow it indoors.
I do not use pesticides. If it gets infested with: gnats, white fly or scale insects will be the end of it.
Bake compost lightly in oven try to kill possible insect egg infestation.
I do well with outdoor lavender, but have to keep an eye on rosemary beetle & (coocoos spit? ).
Planning to bring lavender and rosemary indoors to keep mosquitoes out.
Good luck

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@aileen thank you for posting about this. I look forward to any ideas posted here. This year I will attempt doing my first indoor herb garden. I bought a few starter kits for indoors. Is a grow light required or will the outdoor light be enough? I will have them near light but not directly in the sunlight. Blessed be.

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Do allow drying out between waterings.
Use one finger to test for humidity in compost.
I use oyster shells now to decorate pot surface and keep plant warm.
Heat accumulated on shells is released at dusk.
Shells provide better nutrients than lime.

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It’s seems is also good Feng Shui.
Move your pots to the south area in your house.

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Play classic music or talk to them, they are living things after all.

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I was going to say sing to them.

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they will appreciate it surely!

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Basil loved sunlight by the window in the south area.
You can try moving then by midday to North area or away from window.
They were happy with plenty of light and water.
Artificial light at dusk helps to grow fast and healthy plants.
These lights are usually used for crafts and vivariums.

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Artificial light provides warmth.
You’ll have to adjust height and moving away from time to time.
A fan also helps to keep temperature in check.
Open windows brings pests indoors.
Use room temperature water.
I do not like cold showers either!
Rain water or tap water left overnight to evaporate clorine.
An ice cube place on top of soil to provide drip moisture, used in orchids.

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I definitely agree with one :hugs: @basil , when I water my babies I talk to them, it really helps. For me I do see results.

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I tried a grow light, and all of my plants died anyway. It has been frustrating because my outdoors are beautiful and I have no problem growing all sorts of veggies and herbs. I am thinking about getting a mini green house. But of course they cost a lot.

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I know the feeling, @aileen- herbs that thrive outdoors can really struggle when brought inside :sweat_smile: It’s frustrating when a plant that was doing great suddenly withers away!

@Basil shared some great advice and recommendations- I have also had some luck with basil indoors :herb::+1: . Rosemary is another hardy plant that I have had luck with indoors.

Herbs can be really picky- each one requires the right amount of sunlight/shade, warmth/cold, and water/dryness. I would recommend experimenting with both herbs and locations in your house- a spot that one herb hates may be the perfect place for a different herb :house_with_garden: .

And if herbs just aren’t happy indoors in the winter at your place, don’t give up on having greenery! There are many houseplants and other kinds of nature that can easily tough out the cold winter months inside. Succulents and spider plants are some of my personal faves :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

Good luck to all of the green witches- warm weather is coming for those of us in the northern hemisphere. We’ll be able to plant and harvest outside again soon! :grin::bouquet:

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I remember my first spider plant. They said is the easiest plant to grow, nothing can kill it. I did.
To-date I have lots of them. I just found that the plant is edible.
On a visit to my home town, discovered that spider plants can thrive in outdoor gardens and look better than indoor pots.
Aloe Vera, wipping ficus, mother’s tongue, ZZ plant, jade plant, cannas, lavander, rosemary, russian comfrey, hostas, poppies- just a few of the plants I owe, and through trial and error, have begun to understand them.
In return, they give me beauty and everything else.
They are my babies.
I can wait to get blooms again and see hoards of pollinating insects arriving to feed throughout the whole summer.
There’s so much I could tell about my little garden: the fig tree, the bay leaf, the vine, honeysuckle.
They are all living in a tiny space, attracting all kind of little creatures.
Despite all the ups and downs, would not trade it to move back to live in a flat.
I am really blessed.

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They are beautiful greenhouses and polytunnels, but yes, there are no cheap.
U can find ways around: clutches, cold frames…

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And trying to put them close to eachother.
They like to mingle when I am not around.
When it rains, rush to get all my plants out the house for a good drink.
Although I collect rain water, they grow happier after a good shower.

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I think @wendy4 has a hydroponic garden! :herb: And someone else in the forum recently got a smart garden kit too, but now I can’t remember who it was. :sweat_smile:

@basil Have you tried those? What do you think about hydroponics?

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I use aerogarden.com It is simple and they replace anything that fails to grow.

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No yet, but I’d search on the subject.
The simplest involves to paint a plastic container, so water will not grow algae.
That’s how the whole growing Basil started.
Bought a plant from the supermarket and cut off some stems and place them in water, both basil and lemon balm (slower) grew roots after a week.
I like the idea of a pond with fish feeding the plants.
In Japan, farmers feed ducks, leftovers from ducks feed koi, vegetables can grow on floating trays.
The system can be as simple or elaborated as we like it.
Spring is coming, not planning to go back to Spain til autumn, so will comeback to this idea again.
I hate the gnats that infest my herbs. Don’t like to use pesticides, so water kit may be the way forward.
Would love to have an aquarium, but apparently Feng Shui recommends 9 fish minimum.
I bought a kit that uses adjustable light, to grow herbs.
Will take a picture soon and post it here.

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Oh, there’s some sort of liquid fertilizer to feed the plants.
The videos I’d watched, they mention plants grown stronger and faster than using compost.
I’ve noticed that after moving the plants from water to soil, took a bit of adjusting time. Seems they get a bit of a shock.
The longer the roots, the less trauma for the new plants.
Some people prefer to grow Basil from seeds, with sweet Basil I like to use the water method.
Would love to grow as many Basil varieties as possible this year.
Apologies for the long answer.
My partner says am incapable of giving a short response!:grimacing:

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