I could not explain it better!

This Village is located a few hundred miles away from where I am from.
As legend goes: “San Andrés de Teixido, if you do not visit us alive, you’ll visit us dead”!
I believe Tammy has put together a great article of this creepy little village.
I could not do it better!
Enjoy it🙏
I have saved the article to read it later. There’s so much stuff I didn’t know.:thinking:

San Andrés de Teixido – Spain’s weirdest village? – Tammy Tour …
I was flickering pages on this book I bought a while ago:
The complete book of spells, curses & magical recipes; by Leonard R.N.Ashley.


I also found this reference in this book:

When I was in my early teens, I heard my mum occasionally praying to San Expedito" abogado de los imposibles".
-Advocate for Impossibles?
46 years later I stumbled upon this reference!
Inland Galicia is rooted in superstitious traditions.

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Interesting finds, @Basil! Thank you for sharing, and also for adding in the article title/author and book- they look like they are worth a read :open_book: :star_struck:

That’s really interesting about the phrase “knock on wood”- I say it all the time, but I never looked into finding the deeper meaning! Good to know the classic phrase is based on a lucky gesture :evergreen_tree:

Thanks again, Basil! :blush:

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My family has this one: The bed should not be with the feet towards the door because that is the position of the dead.

And then the old saying: “haberlas, haylas!”

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@Francisco. Kind of Feng Shui principle!.
Just come up with this theory, because as a child seen it many times when I had the chance to travel to the countryside.
Women all dressed in black, grieving and crying, gathered in a small room looking at the deceased for a few days.
There’s so much energy trapped. Those women are reluctant to let the spirit go.
We’re so attached to the material world.
I think it’s important to care for old traditions, but let go equals the free flow of energy. Always heard about dead relatives contacting the leaving ones.
¡El muerto al hoyo, qué viva el bollo!
They are dead, but life goes on.
On the subject of “Meigas”, any woman could be one. I do not want point any fingers, but I know one or two.
This old folk comes probably from Franco times. Too much bad energy flowing during the civil war.
There’s a flat fish known as meiga.
image

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@Francisco. Perhaps has something to do the way eyes are positioned: ¡Mal de Ojo!:face_with_hand_over_mouth:

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Yes! I was reading about this and came upon this. Did you know about the conxuro da queimada?? It’s a drinking ritual to banish the bad spirits.

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@Francisco. You just brought joy to my heart reminding me of my roots.
Every year people gather wood to make large and small piles that will be light up " La noche de San Juan". 24th. June.

Saint John’s Eve (Fiesta de San Juan)

I believe is Summer solstice. We drink queimada(cinnamon is added) and eat thick slices of rustic bread, soaked with the juices of fatty grilled sardines from a barbeque.
I believe last year they banned the festivities due to pandemia.
We have to jump over the fires to keep bad spirits away.
I’m going to enjoy reading the full article :pray:
Galicia & Portugal share language roots.
They consider us brothers, something can not be said of the rest of Spain.
Check Wikipedia article on use of traditional plants.
Mum use to soak herbs overnight and was her face in the morning.

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That’s wonderful! I visited Lisbon once on San Juan and it was awesome. Endless bonfires going all night long. I wish they did the same when I was growing up :argentina: but unfortunately it’s winter in June (southern hemisphere) so there weren’t any special rituals for that date. Thanks for sharing!

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@Francisco
This entroido is celebrated in Santiago de Compostela, no longer capital of the 4 provinces.
This one is very fancy!:smile_cat:

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Went to Nazaré once. The food was great, in supermarkets and local fish restaurants.
There’s a massive religious business going on there. They sell all sort of Christian faith liturgy, including wax limbs, larger than San Andrés de Teixido.

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@Francisco.
Have you read this one?
Very interesting :smile_cat:

@Francisco

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I love the festivals and the dancing. In My , there’s a church I attended where we all dressed up and danced for the Oaxaca festival. I dressed up and danced. It was fun. We paraded all around out city. That video brought back memories. Of course it wasn’t from the actual country but it’s in my roots.

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@christina4. There’s a connection with the dance, dressing up, music & Carnival.
Whatever the season they all have something in common, forgetting the hardships and have fun for a few days.
Is all about letting your hair down, isn’t it?.
I think was Venice in medieval times. They allowed people to fool around for a few days to relax from the restrictions imposed by the church.
Very little has changed. Is good though that we are allowed to resurface obscure traditions that allows to be in harmony with everything on this planet🙏

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Yes and even before that! The Greek and Romans had Kronia and Saturnalia. For example, during Saturnalia, the slaves were allowed to disobey a command without being punished for their deed. They would even swap clothes with their masters and would be served with food and wine.

“The Kronia was a time for social restraints to be temporarily forgotten. Slaves were released from their duties, and participated in the festivities alongside the slave-owners. Slaves were “permitted to run riot through the city, shouting and making a noise.” - Source

I know carnival is usually loud but they take the noise levels to a whole new level!! :laughing:

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Is that where comes: king for a day?:smiley:

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