Lavender 💜

So, I’m doing some research for a podcast episode I’ll be recording soon and thought I would share part of my take on a common way correspondences are created.

The term correspondence refers to a meaning given to an item, color, scent, etc. There are a lot of different schools of thought on how correspondences are created or found, but a common one I find is especially useful with herbs.


Image is my own

Many times, the magickal correspondence of an herb directly correlates to its medicinal properties. Now, this isn’t always the case, but it is interesting to look at if you look up certain herbs and spices.

Image by Rebekka D from Pixabay

Let’s take lavender, for example.

According to WebMD…

Lavender contains an oil that seems to have sedating effects and might relax certain muscles. It also seems to have antibacterial and antifungal effects. (1)

What do we use lavender for in magick? Anxiety relief, depression relief, and a general calming effect! That directly correlates to the first possible effect of lavender - sedating effects and relaxing of certain muscles.

I’d like to challenge you to look up a favorite - or random - herb on WebMD and see what it says. Does it correlate to your magickal correspondence of that herb?


(1) https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-838/lavender

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Oh cool idea to look them up. Nice article @MeganB

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Thank you :slight_smile: I’m trying to get all my notes written down so I can record my podcasts and videos ahead of time for next month lol I don’t want to have to worry about it the week before, the week during, and the week after we move.

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How soon you moving??

We’ll be leaving here on June 20th or 21st depending on when the movers get here.

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Oh it’s getting close!!!

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I know lol we’re getting more excited, but more anxious for the drive

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I have driven across the US from Oregon a couple of times, lots to see, a few places are boring…the road goes on forever and ever, but most of all you will see so much!

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I think the only place I’m really excited to see is the Parthenon in Nashville! I’m hoping that it will be open to visit. If not, at least it won’t be as far away as it is now lol

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This is super interesting :smiley: I always try to note down the medical properties as well as the magical attributes when I add herbs to my collection. I wonder how the correspondences work with crystals :thinking:

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One of the most magickal herbs that I see everywhere tends to be Rue…! :herb:

So I decided to look up rue on WebMD. Good idea!

Rue is used as a medicine for a long list of conditions. It is used for digestion problems including loss of appetite, upset stomach, and diarrhea. It is also used for heart and circulation problems including heart palpitations and (arteriosclerosis). Some people use rue for breathing problems including pain and coughing due to swelling around the lungs (pleurisy).

Rue is used for other painful conditions including headache, arthritis, cramps, and muscle spasms; and for nervous system problems including nervousness, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Bell’s palsy.

Other uses include treatment of fever, hemorrhage, hepatitis, “weakness of the eyes,” water retention, intestinal worm infestations, and mouth cancer. Rue is also used to kill bacteria and fungus.

So many uses! Traditionally it’s just “cleansing”, “warding off”, but apparently it makes a lot of sense to have some rue around the house. :pray:

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Judy Hall is one of the most comprehensive authors on crystals. Her book The Illustrated Guide to Crystals uses Zodiac correspondences where she links the Elements to crystal energies (Air, Fire, Water, Earth).

Also, speaking of medical properties, WebMD has a page on Crystal Healing and evidence-based science.

The placebo effect is almost certainly at play. And the mere act of doing something to take control of your destiny can often boost hope, brighten mood, and improve your ability to cope with a chronic condition. (…)

Ted Kaptchuk, PhD, director of the Program in Placebo Studies at Harvard Medical School, says the placebo effect is often wrongly assumed to be “all in your head” – a “fake” response to an inert substance. But brain imaging studies have shown that when a patient performs an action, such as taking a sugar pill or getting a sham acupuncture session, it activates very specific regions in the brain and can trigger the release of feel-good hormones like endorphins, dopamine, and natural painkillers.

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Thank you for the recommendation! I’ve only recently begun really working with crystals, so I’m keen on learning more about them :relaxed: :dizzy:

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He he he…doctors and the general public are finding out what herbs cure what, and learning that the pharmaceutical industry uses a lot of them…with additives of course. But people are shocked to find out what willow, digitalis, and cascara are used for to name a couple lol

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Glad I could provide some inspiration to learn more!

My correspondence information for crystals tends to come from their physical properties - what are they practically used for? - as well as the feeling I get from them as an animist.

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