Bad witchy habits

I have two bad witchy habits. One, I save the bulbs of all my fresh flowers. For example, when I buy fresh flowers, I remove them when they die or dry out but I cant seem to throw them out so I save them. Secondly, I save all jars. For some reason I cant seem to throw them either. What can you all suggest that I could do with all my dead flower bulbs?

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Greetings, @corey1! :blush:

As both a fellow Green Witch and a bit of a hoarder myself, I know the feeling. Traveling usually forces me to be selective with what I hold onto, but after a year and half in one location (thanks, pandemic) I’ve built up a collection too.

The space under my kitchen sink is packed with pots of soil and even a bag of last year’s daffodil bulbs that I didn’t get around to planting. Not to mention the drawer with jars and mismatched lids :sweat_smile:

Luckily for folks like us, there are loads of possibilities for jars- have you considered using them for Jar Spells? Jars are also wonderful for storage- such as for organizing herbs or spell ingredients (@roxanne shared some wonderful Witchy Jar Labels). For mundane things, I keep my paintbrushes in one jar :paintbrush: , and pens and pencils in another :pencil2: . Not to mention the spare change jar as well! :moneybag: Really great for organizing.

Dead flower bulbs are a bit trickier. You could offer them to a deity of plants and the earth (like Gaia) :earth_africa: , or to a deity representing the cycle of life and death (such as the Horned God) :wilted_flower: . And there’s always composting- a ritual of giving that which has faded to fuel new life to come :seedling:

Hope that helped to spark your creativity! Blessed be, Corey :sparkling_heart:

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@TheTravelWitch
Make a Bokashi bin, this way dead bulbs that not even deities will want, can return to earth nurishing your new bulbs.
Let then dry and use then on your pots as mulch.:+1:
The difference between living in a country house and a flat, is there’s room to store all the jars in the world for future use.
Isn’t time that people living in cities get a bit greener?- it’s all about creating waste.
But not everyone can afford to live in the countryside.
My dad was a farmer, was a hoarder, but when it came to find the right piece or substitute for the right job, He knew where to look.:mouse2::rat:
And there’s good and bad hoarding!
Which is also good housekeeping. You give an item a second use, rather than bin it and forget.

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Yes, I plan to do many jar spells and I love the idea of giving them back to nature dieties.

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Believe it or not, I recently became a member of a community garden and I have my own plot. We also have bins to make compost.

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@corey1. I do believe you. Well done!
Recently came back from a trip to Spain.
The area I used to live has improved greatly. Lots of bars and restaurants, but there’s a price to it. Not just the noise, but the rubbish they generate.
Waste is collected daily, except Saturday.
A minority of foreign people pick stuff to sale later, that otherwise would go to wasteland.
But my point is what we do in our caves.
I was staying with a girl friend. She had a very clean house, but very little was recycled.
Lots of chemicals to clean. I like clean tidy borrows, but to me looks unbalanced.
If keeping a place spotless means killing the planet, then I am happy to call myself untidy and hoarder.
There are now clever containers that turn kitchen waste into food for plants, with little odour and no flies.
I know neighbours that work on allotments, turning dirt into tasty crops.:blush:
It’s this not witchcraft?
Working with the elements and transform somey not well seen by some people into food that keep us alive and allow us to grow.

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I for one save jars, too!!! The bulbs will grow back every year. If not planted, you can paint them and dress them up idk lol

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@christina4 @corey1 @TheTravelWitch.
How you remove the sticky stuff left after peeling off the label?
I’ve tried hot water, but do not work.
I use white spiri, but have to wash the jar after to get rid of the nasty smell.
Why can companies come with a solution to remove it easily?
Or it’s all about what you do whit that is your business policy🤔

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I’ve had good luck with boiling the jars or just letting them soak in water for a day or two. You can even use this stuff called Goo-Be-Gone that gets sticky adhesive off!


As for the original post, I have a cabinet full of jars that I haven’t used yet. I’m hoping to collect enough of them to store dry herbs in so I don’t have to buy any jars :laughing: I’ve got some salt in one on my altar space and the leftover Imbolg powder I made in 2020 in another. Jars are a witch’s best friend :rofl:

As for the plant material, @TheTravelWitch has given you some great advice for those and I don’t have anything else to add.

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@MeganB. It’s sold in UK.
Thanks will give a go that and boiling.
Seems water from kettel is not hot enough😃

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Coreyl, if you’re witchy habits are bad, we all have them. Take heart, you are not alone. Can you plant the bulbs? Otherwise put them in your garden as a form of feeding your plants.

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I found a nice recipe for this: take oil (any oil) and add baking soda to it until it becomes a sticky paste. Rub the paste on the sticky stuff and it should come off. I usually warm up the jar under hot water before that, I’m not sure if it’s necessary but it might help… :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

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@CelestiaMoon

Will try, thanks👍

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You can soak them in hot soapy water & after a few minutes, the labels should just slide off. You can also set them in your dishwasher, run a cycle and they usually are gone. (Don’t forget to clean the bottom of you dish- washer) it gets messy.

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