More Stories of Brigid

Just popping in here to share my newest video. I know many people enjoyed my last post about Things You (Probably) Didn’t Know :fire: About Brigid and I’ve found more! This video has at least one duplicate from the first post, but the others are different. One story even comes directly from Irish Folklore!

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Looking forward to watching it later :slight_smile: The other video was really interesting, there’s always more to learn in this craft isn’t there <3 thank you <3

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I was just reading about Brigid & trying to decide what I wanted to do as an offering for her on my altar. While reading about her I came across this website to see if your lineage can go back to a God or Goddess. The clans had claimed them & I have an Irish/Celtic goddess that is attached to my maiden name! The site is here: Celtic Divine Ancestors. My divine ancestors are:

The Cailleach: Winter Goddess & Divine Ancestor

The Cailleach is an ancestral goddess to many Irish people alive today. There is more than one old Irish sept that claims her as an ancestor. If your ancestors were part of the Corcu Loigde or Corcu Duibne (later called the Dairine), you can claim Cailleach as your fairy goddess ancestor.

AND

Flidais: Celtic Goddess of the Forest

Flidais is an ancient Celtic Goddess of the earth, forest, and fertility often depicted with a set of antlers. She is one of the Tuatha De Dannan and was beloved by the Deisi people and later on claimed as an ancestor of the Dal gCais tribes.

I have been working on my genealogy for many years & I love working with the Irish side & the Italian side. I feel much more connected to that side of my family.

My 2 main things to focus on with my craft right now are astrology & Brigid. There is so much more that I want to work on but if I go after them all right now, I will surely burn out & get overwhelmed. I’m looking forward to learning about them both though.

Thank you for the information, sorry if I rambled off topic. I just get excited because I know you are working with Brigid & learning Irish & Celtic too.

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Thank you! And yes, definitely always more to learn! Being in the craft in any form makes a student forever.

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It’s interesting that you mention the Cailleach (cal-ee-ack, if you didn’t know how to say it :blush:) – there is at least one story in Scottish lore that says the Cailleach and Brigid are connected.

According to the Scottish folklorist Donald MacKenzie, Bride (the Scottish Brighid) is imprisoned in Ben Nevis by the hag goddess known as the Cailleach during the winter months before being freed by Angus Og, the god of love. An alternative version of the same seasonal legend states that the Cailleach can transform herself from a terrifying hag in the winter half of the year to a beautiful young maiden in the summer half- implying that Bride and the Cailleach are the same entity.

Loop of Brighid: Bride, the Cailleach and Nicnevin | Christopher Scott Thompson (patheos.com)

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Although Brigid doesn’t take a central role in my deity worship, it is always lovely to learn more about Her :blush: Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom, @MeganB- your love and respect for Brigid really carry through into your video! :hearts:

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Aww thank you @TheTravelWitch :hugs: I’m always happy to share!

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