Daisies 💮 Of the Element Earth

I know I already talked about some of my plants in my response for the :seedling: Weekly Witchy CHALLENGE - From Seed to Sprout, but growing food in my garden is one of the ways that I connect deeply with Earth.

Instead of telling you all about my new pepper plant and how our daisies are coming along, I wanted to talk about the historical medicinal and magickal uses of the lovely little daisy flower.

:white_flower: Daisies - Medicinal :white_flower:

These are the wish flowers my daughter and I planted from seed that I spoke about in this post – Repotting and Wishes :herb: From Seed to Sprout.

They’re doing fairly well, and that is good news for us because we have had some torrential rain and damaging wind. Not to mention that both of these pots had gotten knocked over and dumped out before the seeds even sprouted :sweat_smile: Cats and kids…what can you do?

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Image Source

Daisies are a perennial plant, meaning they grow long-term. They are characterized by their flowers and can grow up to two feet tall. Despite the common daisy being white with a yellow center, there are several different varieties of daisies. They are native to Europe but have become widespread, now thought of as a “weed flower” in some places in the United States.

According to WebMD, daisies have historically been used for…

  • coughs
  • bronchitis
  • disorders of the liver and kidneys
  • inflammation
  • an astringent
  • as a “blood purifier”
  • preventing problems during childbirth
  • pain and soreness
  • mild bleeding
  • applied directly to the skin for wounds and skin diseases

WebMD also says that daisies contain a chemical called saponins that might help skin cells produce more collagen.

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:white_flower: Daisies - Magickal :white_flower:

Since daisies are so common, I figured everyone could benefit from learning just a little more about them. I do not typically work with daisies, though there is a new-to-me plant that I have found here in Florida that looks kind of like a daisy called a Black-Jack (Bidens pilosa).

Daisies apparently have many different correspondences and associates and, when looking at them compared to the medicinal uses, I can see why. If you would like more information on how I personally view correspondences and where they might come from, click here to watch that YouTube video.

Several sources cite the following as magickal correspondences and uses for the lovely daisy flower…

  • Love
  • Protection (particularly for children)
  • Happiness
  • Joyfulness
  • Creativity
  • Abundance
  • Playfulness
  • Healing
  • Clarity
  • Friendship
  • Divination

Per Lillith Dorsey, Herbalriot tells us that daisies have been used for a long time and are a common association with Midsummer.

Decorate the house with daisies at Midsummer’s Eve to bring happiness to the home and to obtain the blessings of faeries. Daisies are also worn at Midsummer for luck and blessings. In the old times, young maidens would weave and wear daisy chains in their hair to attract their beloved. Source

Daisies might also be one of the first divination tools you have ever used. As a child, I used to pick daisies and think about my crush at the time, whoever they were, and chant…

He loves me…he loves me not…he loves me…he loves me not…

Did you ever use the daisy for love divination? Even before you knew what divination was? It certainly is a curious thing to see how folklore and magick follow us through our lives, even before we know what we are doing.

With daisies, it is abundantly clear that there really is nothing this plant can’t do. As always, though, I recommend forming a bond with the plant itself or at least get a feel of the plant’s energy yourself before using it in your work. It may be better at some things than others.


Medical information in this article is for information purposes only. I am not a doctor and my advice or information shared should not be taken as medical advice. Use at your own risk and always consult a physician or medical professional.


Sources and Further Reading

Daisies - WebMD
Daisies - Britannica
Playful Properties of Daisies - Wicca Now
Daisy Magick - Lillith Dorsey

Continuing the discussion from :mountain: Weekly Witchy CHALLENGE - Of the Element Earth

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I love the look of daisies. Thanks for sharing this!

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Oh! This would make the perfect printable! We have daisies up here & I love them. We also have, what we call Brown Eyed Susans that look like a yellow petaled daisy with a brown center. I have those in my front yard! My neighbor has 2 or three bushes of daisies & they get bigger each year! I’ll have to see if maybe I can snip some from her this year. She likes to snip my rhododendron flowers, so maybe she will share with me.

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You have some very hardy wish flowers, @MeganB- they are very determined to survive! :blossom::laughing:

This is wonderful medicinal and magickal information- it looks like daisies have way more uses than I knew about before. Thank you for sharing your wisdom- I learned a lot! :heart:

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You’re welcome @kasie :hugs:

I thought about making it as a printable for my site, but if @Francisco gets to it first that’s okay lol I used to use those Brown Eyed Susans, too. My friend had a huge bush in her yard when we were growing up and that was one of our favorite things to do. That’s also where I got stung by a wasp :honeybee: but oh well lol

Right?! @TheTravelWitch I didn’t think they would survive the cat :cat2: knocking them over, let alone my daughter tripping over them outside but here we are! They’re growing strong!

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